The average bounce rate for a content site

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The average bounce rate for a content site

Whenever someone enters your site and exits without engaging further with the website, a "bounce" happens. Bounce rate reflects the proportion of visitors bouncing off your website. If the visit a minimum of one extra page, Google Analytics assumes that they interacted with the website. Bounce rates are shown in percentages, so, you would like that percentage to remain low. A low bounce rate means that once users land on your site, they search for more content.

The average bounce rate for a website:

Majority of websites report an average bounce rate of between 25% and 70%. As a general rule, a bounce rate of between 25% and 40% is pretty good, while a bounce rate of 41% to 55% is considered average. On the other hand, a bounce rate of 56% to 70% is regarded higher than average, although it is no cause for concern for some websites. Any percentage higher than 70% is a cause for concern for most websites. Besides, a low bounce rate can also indicate the absence of vibrant content on the site which might not be useful.

Notwithstanding its inconsistent quality, the bounce

For an average site, the bounce rate is expected to oscillate between 40% to 55%. If it goes beyond 50%, it's possibly time to find out which categories of content or users are pushing the bounce rate up. A bounce rate of 60% is not necessarily bad; it depends on the site.

What your average bounce rate means:

Notwithstanding its inconsistent quality, the bounce rate can signify deeper issues that need to be resolved. A high bounce rate serves as a warning sign for an engagement issue. That’s because website visitors should visit various pages to explore your offerings and access the content you have introduced to the site to inform and enhance loyalty and trust.

The average bounce rate for a content site

Although a bounce rate of 0% is unlikely, you want to examine whether a paid channel such as a paid display or search has a high bounce rate. This might be an indicator that ads or adjustments to the website may be required. Simply put, a high marketing bounce rate is cash off your wallet. You also need to be smart to take a look at other similar websites' bounce rates.

Set your target bounce rate:

Instead of trying to keep up with the joneses or even their flashy 27 percent bounce rate, you need to set a benchmark for your site and strive to improve its relevant fields. When setting the benchmark for your website, consider the user's intentions and the significance of the content. For instance, websites that are concerned with events, users are often interested in the date, time, location, and that’s all; they leave once they get that information. Therefore, the bounce rate on these sites will sway to a higher percentage, though that's good since the user's needs are still met.

For an online clothes store, users will possibly navigate the site a bit longer. Therefore, the bounce rate on this website is lower. For e-commerce websites, an upward pattern would be worrying because when visitors leave the website too soon, it inevitably means the sale is lost.

Remember, you should not put a lot of emphasis on website engagement analytics such as on-site time or bounce rate instead of data on conversions. Although tracking and understanding these indicators are beneficial, they are just a small part of the digital content strategy.

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